Ancient Hittite History 1625-1237 B.C. (Part I)

by Tom
(St. Louis)

Hittite king Mursilas 1625-1595 B.C.

Hittites sack Babylon bringing down Amorite king Samsu-ditana's government.

Hittite king Hantilas 1595-1564 B.C. has Mursilas murdered upon his arrival back home.

Hittite king Zidanta 1564-1551 B.C. murdered all of Hantilas sons to become king over the Hittites. Zidanta paid Egyptian king Thutmose I tribute.

Hittite king Ammuna 1551-1529 B.C. murdered his father Zidanta; and Ammuna was attacked by Mitanni king Parattarna's 1542-1516 B.C. forces.

Hittite king Huzziya 1529-1513 B.C.
Huzziya paid Thutmose III tribute. Huzziya tried slaying his son-in-law Telepinus 1513-1489 B.C., who wrote the Laws of Succession trying to end political assassinations.

Hittite king Tudhaliyas I 1489-1467 B.C. troops stir up trouble for Egyptian king Amenhotep II 1495-1471 B.C.; and Mitanni king Saustatar's 1516-1476 B.C. forces in Asia.

Hittite king Arunwandas I 1467-1444 B.C. army loses ground to Egyptian king Thutmose IV 1471-1462 B.C. army; and Mitanni king Artatama's I 1476-1455 B.C. army FORMED in a marriage alliance against him.

Hittite king Tudhaliyas II 1444-1428 B.C. tries to recover lost territories. Mitanni king Shuttarna 1455-1445 B.C. marries his daughter off to Egyptian king Amenhotep III 1462-1424 B.C. (Joshua destroys Jericho in 1455 B.C.)

Mitanni king Tushratta 1445-1406 B.C. marries his sister to Amenhotep III in a military alliance.
Mitanni king Tushratta offers Amenhotep III war booty he had captured from Hittite king Suppiluliumas I 1428-1392 B.C.

Hittite king Suppiluliumas I 1428-1392 B.C. pays Egyptian king Akenaton 1424-1407 B.C. tribute.

Akenaton has a military alliance with Mitanni king Tushratta 1445-1406 B.C. Hittite king Suppiluliumas forces attack Tushratta's vassal states late in Akenaton's reign; and Akenaton sends no troops to defend his uncle Tushratta.

Mitanni prince Artatama II starts a rebellion against Tushratta and Tushratta is killed in the Mitanni civil war. Egyptian king Semenkare 1407-1406 B.C. takes no action against the Hittites.

Comments for Ancient Hittite History 1625-1237 B.C. (Part I)

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Apr 06, 2013
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Did Mitanni king Tushratta have Iron?
by: Bruce

Egyptian king Nimmuriya (Amenhotep III) took as a wife the Mitanni princess Tatum-khipa the daughter of Mitanni king Tushratta. Princess Tatum-khipa was sent with a dowry represented by a great number of vessels, furniture, objects of gold, precious stones, such as lapis-lazuli, silver, copper and IRON!

The iron technology of the Hittites indeed filtered its way to the Hittite enemies, whom likely acquired Hittite iron technology after Hittite king Tudhaliyas I 1489-1467 B.C. had died; and Hittite king Arunwandas I 1467-1444 B.C. had found himself confronted by the military alliance between Egyptian king Thutmose IV 1471-1462 B.C. and Mitanni king Artatama I 1476-1455 B.C.

The Mitanni backed Arzawa nation burned the Hittite capital Hattusas to the ground in Hittite king Arunwandas I reign.

Mitanni king Shuttarna II 1455-1445 B.C. had a military alliance with Amenhotep III.

The next Egyptian king to follow Thutmose IV reign is Egyptian king Amenhotep III 1462-1424 B.C. who recieves the IRON from Mitanni king Tushratta 1445-1406 B.C.

Apr 05, 2013
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Ancient Mitanni Kings List
by: Rex

All the Mitanni kings, from Mitanni king Parattarna to the end of the kingdom's last king Shattura II's history, can be proven with no missing links or mythical kings.

(1)Mitanni king Parattarna fights Thutmose III's army

(2)Mitanni king Shaushtar fights Thutmose III army and Shaushtar's vassals states along Syria's coast fight Amenhotep II army.

(3)Mitanni king Artatama's daughter marries Thutmose IV.

(4)Mitanni king Shuttarna's II daughter marries Amenhotep III

(5)Artashumar reigns briefly. Artashumar is assassinated.

(6)Tushratta's sister marries Amenhotep III. Tushratta pays Akenaton tribute.

(7)The Mitanni prince Artatama II rebels against Tushratta and Artatama is allied with Hittite king Suppiluliumas I.

(8)Mitanni king Shuttarna III is contemporary with Hittite king Suppiluliumas I.

(9)Mitanni king Shattiwaza/Mattiwaza is given reign over Hanigalbat by king Suppiluliumas four years before the Hittite king dies.

(10)Mitanni king Shattiwaza/Mattiwaza is loyal to Suppilulimas I son Hittite Mursilas II, whose forces repel an Egyptian attack lead by Egyptian king Horemheb. Mattiwaza dies in Hittite king Muwatallis sixth year when the Hittites are having war with Egyptian king Seti I.

(11)Mitanni king Shattura I causes trouble with the Assyrians when Hittite king Muwatallis forces are fighting Egyptian king Ramses II army. The Assyrian king Adad-Nirrari I then replaces Shattura I, and appoints the Mitanni kings son Wasashatta to the Mitanni throne.

(12) Wasashatta wanted to rebel against the Assyrians but he would risk too much. The Hittite king Mursilas III was at war with his uncle Hattusilas.

(13) Mitanni king Shattura II, Wasashatta's son rebels against Assyrian king Shalmanesar I who destroys the Mitanni nation.

(14)Ramses II gives Hittite king Hattusilas Lebanon as a wedding present, some twelve years before Hattusilas dies. Hattusilas son Tudhaliyas III quickly grants the Amorites in Lebanon independence so they can help him fight the Assyrian king Shalmanesar I.

(15) Some Canaanites using Hittite iron technology and the alliance, use their iron chariots against Israel. (Judges 4:2-3)

(16)Mitanni History is short and Mitanni history gets right to the heart of the historical debate.

Why do ancient history writers leave time gaps in their history, when Mitanni history is validated by cross checking Egyptian, Hittite and Assyrian history?

Apr 05, 2013
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Searching Hittite History For the Real Truth
by: Robert

Trevor Bryce (2005) said Hittite king Arunwanda I was the adopted son of Tudhaliyas I and his wife Nikklamati.

Ali Dincol (2008) stated Kantuzili, oversees of the elite chariot fighters was a son of Arnuwandas I and a brother of Tudhaliyas II.

H.W.F. Saggs The Babylonians p. 417 listed Tudhaliyas II 1460-1440 B.C., Arnuwandas I 1440-1420 B.C. He then adds a Hattusilas II 1420-1400 B.C., a Tudhaliyas III 1400-1385 B.C. and an Arunwandas II 1385-1375 B.C. before Hittite king Suppiluliumas comes to power.

(Bible chronology moves up Suppiluliumas reign from 1375 B.C. to 1428 B.C., some 53 years since king Solomon's reign was moved up 55 years. Solomon's 4th year was 1015 B.C. some 480 years after the Exodus.

The Chronology based here is on biblical chronological time where the Exodus took place in 1495 B.C. moving Thutmose III's death up 55 years to 1495 B.C. in Biblical time.

The Egyptian Biblical Shishak (1 Kings 14:25) death at 919 B.C., when he invaded Jerusalem and died a few months later biblically happened 55 years earlier in 974 B.C., thus moving up Egyptian chronology by 55 years.

The Chronology based on the Bible makes more sense. Tudhaliyas I, followed by Arnuwandas I and Tudhaliyas II like Trevor Bryce and Ali Dincol have concluded.

Hittite king Tudhaliyas I coming to power after the 1495 B.C. Hebrews Exodus. Tudhaliyas I 1489-1467 B.C. stirring up trouble for Mitanni kings Saustatar 1516-1476 B.C. and Artatama I 1476-1455 B.C.

While the Hebrews were in the wilderness Tudhaliyas I was stopping Egyptian king Amenhotep II 1495-1471 B.C. merchants along the Egyptian Syrian trade route from carrying out business.

H.W.F. Saggs does have Mitanni kings Parattarna and Saustatar reigns aligned with Egyptian king Thutmose III and Saustatar's reign, ending right before Thutmose IV becomes king of Egypt which is vital in mapping out the real chronology, when we
review Trevor Bryce and Ali Dincol's work and discover Tudhaliyas II was killed by Hittite king Suppiluliumas as shown in Mursilas II's poem.

H.W.F. Saggs show the Mitanni kings following Saustatar are Artatama I, Shuttarna II, and Tushratta which is correct. Artatama's daughter married Egyptian king Thutmose IV, so Saustatar's reign had to end before Thutmose IV and about 14 years after Tushratta died, Hittite king Suppiliuliumas I died of plague.

Then comparing Mitanni and Egyptian history together we weed out the Hittite kings which did not exist.

I am fascinated by witnessing all this new information unfolding before our very eyes, disputing historians who merely threw numbers down 20 years apiece without correlating the time from Mitanni king Parattarna having done battle with Egyptian king Thutmose III, and Mitanni king Tushratta losing his empire to Hittite king Suppiluliumas, proving some of those Hittite kings could not have existed!

At least Trevor Bryce and Ali Dincol have stumbled upon the truth about Tudhaliyas I, Arunwandas I and Tudhaliyas II.

Apr 05, 2013
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Ancient Aleppo History
by: Terry

Aleppo, Syria was being rebuilt 1595-1585 B.C. Aleppo king Sarra-el (1585-1559 B.C.) reigned over Aleppo when Hittite king Hantilas (1595-1564 B.C.) reigned over the disorganized Hittites.

Aleppo king Abba'el/Abba-ili II (1559-1542 B.C.)reigned when Hittite king Zidanta (1564-1551 B.C.) and Kizzuwanda king Pilliya had a military alliance.

Aleppo king Illi-Illima/Illimilmma I (1542-1535 B.C.) dethroned Aleppo king Abba-el, causing Idrimi to flee Aleppo. Mitanni king Parattarna 1542-1516 B.C. backed Illi-Illima's revolt.

Aleppo is incorporated under Alalakh's government
under the vassal Idrimi 1535-1505 B.C., who submits to Mitanni king Parattarna and Mitanni king Saustatar's 1516-1476 B.C. rule.

Alalakh's kingship 1535-1464 B.C.
Idrimi entered Hittite territory to collect war booty in Hittite king Ammuna's reign 1551-1526 B.C. Hittite king Huzziya 1526-1513 B.C. paid tribute to Egyptian king Thutmose III, after the Kizzuwandan Mitanni king Pilliya had burned down Hittite cities in Amunna's reign and Idrimi followed his forces into Hattusas to collect war booty.

Alalakah's king Niqmepa/Niqmiepu II 1505-1480 B.C. Idrimi's son was a contemporary of Mitanni king Saustatar 1516-1476 B.C. He sent Egyptian king Amenhotep II 1495-1471 B.C. the Alalakh dancing girl as tribute when Amenhotep II briefly held reign over Syria.

Alalakh's Idrimi grandson Ill-Illima/Illimilimma II 1480-1464 B.C. served as king until Mitanni king Artatama I 1476-1455 B.C. marriage alliance became effective, about 1464 B.C. and Alalakh came under direct Mitanni rule.

Alalakh/Aleppo controlled by Mitanni king Artatama I 1464-1455 B.C.

Alalakh/Aleppo controlled by Mitanni king Shuttarna 1455-1445 B.C.

Alalakh/Aleppo controlled by Mitanni king Tushratta 1445-1410 B.C.

Alalakh/Aleppo taken over by Hittite king Suppiluliumas I 1428-1392 B.C. in 1410 B.C. when Tushratta (Cushan-Rishathaim Judges 3:8) forces are defeated by Israeli judge Othniel; and Hittite king Suppiluliumas I forces take over Alalakh and Aleppo and Suppiluliumas places his son Telipinu on the Aleppo throne in 1410 B.C.

Alalakh and Aleppo then become part of the Hittite empire.

Apr 04, 2013
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Mitanni Egyptian Trade Route
by: John

If you were Mitanni king Tushratta what would be your reaction if the Israelites were attacking your caravans in Canaan before they reached Egypt?

The Israelis skirmished with Mitanni merchants in the Canaanite valley regions, and always retreat into the mountains under their control.

Egyptian king Akenaton sent no troops to keep the Israelites from stopping their attacks. Akenaton was spending all his attention on worshipping his sun god Aton.

Tushratta's empire stretched from the Euphrates river to the Egyptian border to preserve his trade route connections.

This is the reason why Tushratta, the biblical Cushan-Risthathaim, oppressed Israel for eight years.

Apr 04, 2013
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Joshua and Ancient Iron Technology
by: David

All dates given in Biblical Chronological Time.

(1)Joshua dealt with iron chariots. (Joshua 17:17-18) Joshua destroyed Jericho in 1455 B.C. May have dealt with other Canaanites equipped with iron chariots at this time frame 1455-1423 B.C.

(2)Egyptian king Tutankhamon 1406-1396 B.C. was buried with an iron dagger with a golden hilt.

(3)Jabin the Canaanite 1298-1278 B.C. invaded Israel with 900 iron chariots. (Judges 4:2-3)

(4)Egyptian king Merneptah 1280-1268 B.C. battle axe with iron blade was found by archaeologist at Ugarit.

It's not surprising that Mitanni king Tushratta 1445-1406 B.C. elite forces, the Maryannu, had iron chariots; or his name Tvesaratha in Sanskrit translates to having splendid chariots.

Its not surprising the king Tushratta who brought the Mitanni kingdom to the height of its power was Cushan-Rishathaim in Judges 3:8.

Apr 04, 2013
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Tushratta's name in Sanskrit is Tvesaratha
by: Mike

Tushratta's name in Sanskrit I might add Tvesaratha translates: having splendid chariots!

Tushratta's elite warriors who rode iron chariots were called Maryannu.

Apr 04, 2013
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Ancient Hittie Iron Working
by: Mike

Google Hittite Iron working. Find www.indepthinfo.com/history-ancient/hittites.htm

This blog states iron working may have begun in Tudhaliyas II reign. This blog states Tudhaliyas burned Aleppo down to the ground then Hittite enemies the Kaska and Arzawa burned the Hittite capital Hattusas down to the ground.

Check out Tudhaliyas II at (1444-1428 B.C.) remembering Joshua destroyed Jericho in 1455 B.C.

Judges 1:19 And the Lord was with Judah and he drove out the inhabitants of the mountain: but did not drive out the inhabitants of the valley, because they had chariots of iron.

Judges 2:21 I will not henceforth drive out any from before them of the nations which Joshua left when he died.

Mitanni king Tushratta 1445-1406 B.C. (Cushan-Rishathaim Judges 3:8) elite warriors were clothed along with their horses in iron scale armor and they drove iron chariots!

Apr 03, 2013
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The Kizzuwandans
by: Carl

The Kizzuwandans were also a Mitanni tribe. Kizzwandans backed Mitanni king Parattarna (Barattarna) against Hittite king Ammuna and betrayed Mitanni king Saustatar backing Ammunas son-in-law Telipinus.

Hittite king Tudhaliyas I was backed by the Kizzuwandans when he attacked Mitanni king Saustatar's army.

Egyptian king Thutmose III had at least 16 military campaigns against the Mitanni kings Barattarna and Saustatar, and 1 campaign against the Nubians. You may say Thutmose III received limited tribute from the Mitanni since he had to fight so many wars against them. The Mitanni must have defaulted on their payments to Thutmose III.


Apr 03, 2013
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Ancient Aleppo History Revisited
by: Robert

What do we know for sure about Aleppo, Syria?

(1)We know Hittite king Mursilas I who reigned 1625-1595 B.C. destroyed Aleppo, Syria before the end of his reign.

I suspect Hittite kings Hantilas 1595-1564 B.C. and Zidanta 1564-1551 B.C. played no part in Aleppo's history. These Hittite kings were weak and Aleppo was being rebuilt by the Aleppo kings
Sarra-el, Abba-el and Ilim-ilimma.

King Ilim-ilimma son was Idrimi who became king of Alalakh in Mitanni king Parattarna's reign 1542-1516 B.C.

Idrimi became king in Parattarna's 7th year and reigned 1535-1505 B.C.

I believe Hittite king Ammuna's reign 1551-1529 B.C. should be 1551-1519 B.C.; and Hittite king Huzziya reign 1529-1513 B.C. should be 1519-1513 B.C. since Hittite records show Ammuna's reign was longer and Huzziya's reign was shorter.

Kizzuwanda king Pilliya had a military alliance
with the weak Hittite king Zidanta 1564-1551 B.C. and when Mitanni king Parattarna came to reign, the Kizzuwanda king Pilliya switched sides when Hittite king Ammuna reigned and the Hittite cities were set ablaze. Hittite king Huzziya 1519-1513 B.C. wanting Egyptian king Thutmose III's protection paid him tribute.

Aleppo's real history.

1595-1542 B.C. Aleppo kings Sarra-el, Abba-el and Ilim-ilimma reign over Aleppo.

1542-1520 B.C. Mitanni king Parattarna with Idrimi's alliance receives tribute from Aleppo.

1520-1495 B.C. Egyptian king Thutmose III defeats Mitanni king Parattarna's army and receives tribute from Aleppo.

Aleppo rebels at the time Egyptian king Thutmose III dies. Aleppo is aligned with Mitanni king Saustatar 1516-1476 B.C.

1495-1493 B.C. Mitanni king Saustatar recieves tribute.

1493-1487 B.C. Egyptian king Amenhotep II defeats the rebellion in Syria in his second year 1493 B.C. Aleppo and Alalakh come under Egyptian control. Amenhotep II receives as tribute from the Mitanni a dancing girl from Alalakh as part of his war booty.

1487-1467 B.C. Hittite king Tuhaliyas I second year 1487 B.C. he conquers the Mitanni and takes over Aleppo.

1467 B.C. there is a marriage alliance when Mitanni king Artatama I 1476-1455 B.C. daughter marries Egyptian king Thutmose IV 1471-1462 B.C.

1467-1410 B.C. Aleppo is part of the Mitanni empire secured by Artatama I's daughter married to Egyptian king Thutmose IV, Shuttarna's daughter married to Egyptian king Amenhotep III and Tushratta's sister married to Amenhotep III.

1410-1392 B.C. Hittite king Suppiluliumas I 1428-1392 B.C. conquers Aleppo in 1410 B.C. and Aleppo becomes part of the Hittite empire.

Apr 02, 2013
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Hittie Kings & Egyptian Pharaohs
by: Jason

Hittite king Tudhaliyas I does arise to power after Thutmose III dies according to J.G. MacQueen in his book "The Hittites" pages 45-46.

According to MacQueen Tudhaliyas I had a treaty with the king of Kizzuwanda. Tudhaliyas I defeated both Aleppo and the Mitanni most likely after Amenhotep II 1495-1471 B.C. put down the first rebellion in Asia in year two.

Amenhotep II campaigned against Syria in 1493 B.C. and his 9th year 1486 B.C. he only waged war as far as the Sea of Galilee.

Tudhaliyas I immediately went to war against the Mitanni and Aleppo says MacQueen. Tudhaliyas reign 1489-1467 B.C. verified! (Using Bible Chronology)

MacQueen states after Tudhaliyas I died the Hittite empire declined. An Arzawa king and his allies then burned down Hattusas the Hittite capital to the ground. The Arzawa king wanted to have a marriage alliance with an Egyptian king, meaning the Arzawa nation had rose to power by the king asking such a request.

This tradition of marriage alliances began with Mitanni king Artatama I 1476-1455 B.C.

Hittite king Arunwandas I 1467-1444 B.C. sounds right. His whole reign was in decline.

H.W. Saggs, in the book "The Babylonians" p. 417, lists Arunwandas I following a Tudhaliyas, which he says is Tudhaliyas II.

I believe MacQueen's version Tudhaliyas I came to power after Egyptian king Thutmose III died.

Then there is Hittite king Mursilas II in a poem speaking about a weaker Tudhaliyas who would be Suppiluliumas father. Mursilas II blamed the plague striking the Hittite empire on his father Suppiluliumas, who killed his grandfather Tudhaliyas II reigning 1444-1428 B.C. failing to recapture lost territories. Arunwandas I lost to the Hittite enemies welds true Hittite history together.

The Mitanni were still strong, making marriage alliances with the Egyptians. Mitanni king Tushratta 1445-1406 B.C. sister had married Egyptian king Amenhotep III 1462-1424 B.C.

Notice: Egyptian king Akenaton 1424-1407 B.C. had no marriage alliance with the Mitanni. Akenaton failed to keep the Egyptian Mitanni military alliance, opening the door for the arise of the Hittite empire thus benefiting king Suppiluliumas.

Apr 02, 2013
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Tushratta the Opportunist
by: Dale

Mitanni king Tushratta at 1445-1406 B.C. seemed an opportunist. Tushratta was friends of Egyptian king Amenhotep III 1462-1424 B.C.

Tushratta, or otherwise noted as Cushan-Rishathaim, had taken over Israel/Canaan ruling 1418-1410 B.C. extending the Mitanni borders to Egypt.

It was in Egyptian king Akenaton's 5th year 1419 B.C. when he moved the Egyptian capital to Amarna.
Tushratta took advantage of the Canaanite tribes Israel had weakened.

Joshua lived 1533-1423 B.C. (Joshua 24:29), having been 40 years old at the second year the Hebrews left Egypt (Numbers 1:1) 1493 B.C.

He, along with Caleb, gave a good report about the land of milk and honey; and were rewarded by God as they entered Jericho destroying that city in 1455 B.C.

After Joshua had died in 1423 B.C. Israel's elders did not carry out God's command to conquer all of Canaan, so Tushratta saw Israel was weak and conquered their land.

Israel then repented and in 1410 B.C. Judge Othniel won victory against Tushratta. (Cushan-Rishathaim)

Hittite king Suppiluliumas I 1428-1392 B.C. whose Hittite forces had been defeated at the beginning of his conflict with Tushratta-Tushratta, delivered the spoils of war he acquired from Suppiliumas, bragging about the Hittite kings lost to Egyptian king Amenhotep III.

Israel's victory gave Hittite king Suppiliumas the opportunity to stir up rebellion in the Mitanni vassal states.

A civil war developed and Tushratta died at the hands of his own countrymen.

Apr 02, 2013
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Ancient Hittite
by: Roger

Encyclopdia Britannica recorded Hittite king Telipinus reign at 1525-1500 B.C., but states Hittite records fail us until the time of the New Hittite kingdom.

I agree with Telipinus reign at 1513-1489 B.C.

I can see why this research on Hittite history is so important, in cross checking with Egyptian and Mitanni sources.

Real Hittite history shows the Israelites and Hittites must have been on friendly terms in 1495-1237 B.C.

The Hittites never oppress Israel in the history found in the Book of Judges.

Apr 02, 2013
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Aleppo, Syria and Kizzuwandas Unlock the Truth
by: Jay

Syrian Aleppo history shows a slight variation of events as they happened in relation to Hittite history. Kizzuwandas history sheds new light.

Aleppo Syria was destroyed by Hittite king Mursilas I army 1625-1595 B.C.

Hittite kings Hantilas (1595-1564 B.C.) and Zidanta (1564-1551 B.C.) both held control over Aleppo, Syria. Zidanta controlled Syria when Egyptian king Thutmose I forces were marching to the Euphrates river.

Hittites presented Thutmose I with tribute. (Hittite kings Hantilas and Zidanta both played a part in Mursilas I assassination)

Hittite king Ammuna (1551-1529 B.C.) lost control over Aleppo to Mitanni king Parattarna 1542-1516 B.C. The Kizzuwandnas burn down Hittite towns. The Alalakh vasssal king of the Mitanni Idrimi 1535-1505 B.C. receives Hittite war booty to finance the building of his kingdom. (Ammuna assassinated his father Zidanta)

Egyptian king Thutmose III 1549-1495 B.C. goes to war in Asia only after queen Hatshepsut dies in 1527 B.C., some 22 years into the co-regency.

Egyptian king Thutmose III defeats the Mitanni army lead by the Mitanni king Parattarna. The Mitanni allies the Kizzuwandas and Idrimi also pay Thutmose III tribute.

Hittite king Huzziya 1529-1513 B.C. submits tribute to Egyptian king Thutmose III. Huzziya rebuilds Hittite towns. Hittite king Telepinus 1513-1489 B.C. came to power after Huzziya tried killing him.

Hittite king Telepinus signs a peace treaty with the Kizzuwandas when Egyptian king Thutmose III goes to war against Mitanni king Saustatar 1516-1476 B.C.

The Hittites were at peace when the Exodus occurred in 1495 B.C. Amenhotep II 1495-1471 B.C., however, faced two rebellions in Asia early in his reign.

Amenhotep II had trouble with Mitanni forces centered around Aleppo, Syria. Among many items Amenhotep II received as tribute from conquering the Mitanni was a dancing girl from Alalakh, the vassal Mitanni state where Idrimi once had ruled.

Hittite king Tudhaliyas I 1489-1467 B.C. went to war against the Kizzuwandas. Hittite king Tudhaliyas I also went to war against Mitanni king Saustatar near the end of the Mitanni king's reign.

Hittite king Tudhaliyas I was reviving the Hittite empire. He was the cause for Mitanni king Artatama I 1476-1455 B.C. to make a military alliance with Egyptian king Thutmose IV 1471-1462 B.C.

Hittite king Arunwandas I 1467-1444 B.C. had both the Egyptians and Mitanni as his enemies and the Hittite empire declined.

The information Tudhaliyas II 1444-1428 B.C. being Suppiluliumas I 1428-1392 B.C. father as found in Mursilas II's poem ends the "Dark Ages" of Hittite history is an eye opener.

The true order in the blood relationships and the sequence of Hittite kings have come to light.

Its a shame as we are reviewing Aleppo, Syrian history, this city today is being destroyed in the Syrian civil war.

Apr 01, 2013
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The Tel Amarna Letters
by: Dayton

It always seemed like Hantilas II, Zidanta II and Huzziya II were clouding real Hittite history.

The truth surfaces when we align Hittite history with Egyptian and Mitanni history.

The Tel Amarna letters are a great help when we obtain the four kings names;

Assyrian king Ashur-Uballit 1413-1376 B.C., Babylon/Kassite king Burnaburiash 1428-1399 B.C., Hittite king Suppiluliumas I 1428-1392 B.C. Mitanni king Tushratta 1445-1406 B.C.

All whom gave tribute to Egyptian king Akenaton 1424-1407 B.C.

Mursilas II's poem stating Tudhaliyas was Suppiluliumas's father really helped in clearing up some fog in Hittite history, as it caught my eye on your Nubian History presentation.

All those historians on the History Channel, and they won't align Assyrian, Babylon, Biblical, Egyptian, Hittite and Mitanni history together.

You would think the History Channel would be in the education business.

Apr 01, 2013
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Where does Alalakh's king Idrimi Fit In History?
by: Lucas

Lets see how this history may place out.

Thutmose III reign was 54 Years (1549-1495 B.C.) in which queen Hashepsut reigned 22 of those years (1549-1527 B.C.).

Thutmose III's military adventures therefore took place (1527-1495 B.C.)

Thutmose III's forces defeat both Mitanni king Parattarna 1542-1516 B.C. and Mitanni king Saustatar's 1516-1476 B.C. forces in Asia.

Mitanni king Parattarna had taken over Aleppo, Syria in 1542 B.C., a city which had been destroyed by Hittite king Mursilas I in 1595 B.C.

Prince Idrimi from Alalakh fled Parattarna's army and he lives in Canaan for seven years. Idrimi did state he lived under Parattarna's rule.

Thutmose III receives tribute from Hittite king Huzziya 1529-1513 B.C. whose nation had been invaded by the Kizzuwandas, whom burned down many Hittite cities. Huzziya really took a beating.

Mitanni king Parattarna crowned Idrimi king of Alalakh making Idrimi his vassal. Idrimi reigned for 30 years 1535-1505 B.C. Idrimi stole war booty from the Hittites when their cities were burning.

Hittite king Telepinus 1513-1489 B.C. developed peace with the Kizzuwandas.

Egyptian king Amenhotep II 1495-1471 B.C. puts down two major rebellions in Asia. Amenhotep II accepts a dancing girl as tribute from the new king of Alalakh.

Hittite king Tudhaliyas I 1489-1467 B.C. army threatened both Mitanni king Artatama I 1476-1455 B.C. nation and the Egyptian king Thutmose IV 1471-1462 B.C. forces in Asia. Mitanni king Artatama I and Thutmose IV form their marriage alliance.

Hittite king Arunwandas I 1467-1444 B.C. lost Hittite territory in Asia won by Tudhaliyas I in his last reigning years by this new marriage alliance.

Does seem like Alalakh's king Idrimi reign did come before Hittite king Tudhaliyas I came to power. Idrimi showed up in Hittite history when the Hittites were defenseless.

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